New Delhi, FEB 28 2021|| News Desk

Synopsis:
“My greetings to the scientific community and science enthusiasts on the occasion of National Science Day today. On this day in 1928, Sir CV Raman announced his pathbreaking discovery of the ‘Raman Effect’ and changed the face of science in India,” Vice President M Venkaiah Naidu tweeted with #ScienceDay

India celebrates National Science Day today to mark the discovery of the Raman effect by Indian physicist Sir C. V. Raman

Every year, National Science Day is celebrated on February 28, to mark the discovery of the Raman effect by Indian physicist Sir CV Raman, back in 1928. For this discovery, Sir CV Raman was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1930

“My greetings to the scientific community and science enthusiasts on the occasion of National Science Day today. On this day in 1928, Sir CV Raman announced his pathbreaking discovery of the ‘Raman Effect’ and changed the face of science in India,” Vice President M Venkaiah Naidu tweeted with #ScienceDay

The theme for National Science Day 2021 is “Future of STI: Impacts on Education, Skills, and Work”. The theme has been chosen for the purpose of raising public appreciation of the scientific issues involved and the impacts science has on education, skill and work.

CV Raman discovered the Raman Effect in 1928 while working in the laboratory of the Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Kolkata, which helped him in winning the prestigious Nobel Prize in 1930.

In 1986, the National Council for Science and Technology Communication (NCSTC) asked the Government of India to declare February 28 as National Science Day. The Government of India accepted the proposal and declared the day as National Science Day. Accordingly India celebrated the first National Science Day on February 28, 1987.

National Science Day is celebrated by organising public speeches, radio and TV programmes, science movies, science exhibitions on themes and concepts, debates, quiz competitions, lectures and science model exhibitions.

According to the academy citation, the 1930 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to Sir Chandrasekhara Venkata Raman “for his work on the scattering of light and for the discovery of the effect named after him”. He was the first Asian person to receive a Nobel Prize in any branch of science

CV Raman, received the highest civilian award of India, Bharat Ratna, in 1954.

He discovered that when light traverses a transparent material, some of the deflected light changes wavelength and amplitude. This phenomenon was a new type of scattering of light and was subsequently termed as the Raman effect (Raman scattering). Raman won the 1930 Nobel Prize in Physics and was the first Asian person to receive a Nobel Prize in any branch of science.

Born to Hindu Tamil Brahmin parents, Chandrasekhara Venkata Raman was a precocious child, completing his secondary and higher secondary education from St Aloysius’ Anglo-Indian High School at the ages of 11 and 13, respectively. He topped the bachelor’s degree examination at the University of Madras with honours in physics from Presidency College at age 16.

His first research paper, on diffraction of light, was published in 1906 while he was still a graduate student. The next year he obtained an M.A. degree. He was 19 years of age when he joined the Indian Finance Service in Kolkata as Assistant Accountant General. There he became acquainted with the Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science (IACS), the first research institute in India, which allowed him to do independent research and where he made his major contributions in acoustics and optics.

In 1917, he was appointed as the first Palit Professor of Physics by Ashutosh Mukherjee at the Rajabazar Science College under the University of Calcutta. On his first trip to Europe, seeing the Mediterranean Sea motivated him to identify the prevailing explanation for the blue colour of the sea at the time, namely reflected Rayleigh scattered light from the sky, as being incorrect.

He founded the Indian Journal of Physics in 1926. He and Krishnan discovered on 28 February 1928 a novel phenomenon of light scattering, which they called “modified scattering,” but more famously known as the Raman effect. The day is celebrated by the Government of India as the National Science Day every year. Raman moved to the Indian Institute of Science in Bangalore in 1933 to become its first Indian Director. There he founded the Indian Academy of Sciences the same year. He established the Raman Research Institute in 1948 where he worked to his last days.

In 1954, the Government of India honoured him with the first Bharat Ratna, its highest civilian award.

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